Dr. Lisa Brent: Be Well Natural Medicine, Naturopatic Medicine

Season 2, Episode 3

My guest for this podcast is Dr. Lisa Brent.  Dr. Brent a Naturopathic Doctor and founder of her own practice, Be Well Natural Medicine.  Her goal is to utilize the best resources and practices of naturopathic medicine to empower patients to create lifelong habits that promote health and prevent disease.   Her approach draws from all the techniques of integrative medicine.  

In this podcast, we discuss:

  • The origins and focus of naturopathic medicine.
  • What naturopathic medicine provides and the types of services available.
  • How her patients incorporate Dr. Brent into their overall healthcare team.
  • Challenges and doctor access during COVID-19. 
  • Dr. Lisa’s thoughts on COVID-19 and our own individual health strategies.

Today’s Guest

Dr. Lisa Brent is a naturopathic doctor and founder of Be Well Natural Medicine.  

Dr. Lisa Fitzpatrick: Grapevine Health – Health Information the Community Trusts

Season 2, Episode 2

My guest for this podcast is Dr. Lisa Fitzpatrick.  Dr. Lisa is a medical doctor who’s career has spanned research, clinical medicine, global health, community health education, and patient advocacy.  Today, we are discussing her start-up Grapevine Health. Grapevine Health is built on the philosophy that trust and proximity are the keys to engagement and health outcomes.

Dr. Lisa’s resume includes positions with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Washington DC’s Medicaid program, George Washington University School of Medicine, Milken Institute School of Public Health and the Aspen Institute Global Leadership Network.

In this podcast, we discuss:

  • What inspired Dr. Lisa to found Grapevine Health?
  • Philosophies and strategies of Grapevine Health.
  • How Grapevine Health is using storytelling and technology to build trust and engagement?
  • Challenges with the medical community and patients that Dr. Lisa has explored and seeks to improve with Grapevine Health.
  • Dr. Lisa’s thoughts on ways that we can start today accessing information and improving our own health.

Today’s Guest

Dr. Lisa Fitzpatrick is the founder of Grapevine Health.  Her background is in research, clinical medicine, global health, community health education, and patient advocacy.

Alex Haschen: Burnalong – Online Health and Wellness

Season 2, Episode 1

In this podcast, we speak with Alex Haschen who is a personal trainer with specialties in nutrition, youth fitness, and habit change.  He also focuses on business development and client engagement for Burnalong.com. Burnalong is an online health and wellness platform that focuses on bringing people the two things that work offline when we’re getting healthy:  inspiring and relatable instructors and social motivation. Alex shares with us his experiences in bringing health to individuals and companies through his fitness background and engagement through the Burnalong platform.

In this episode, we discuss:

  • How Burnalong is using technology to improve health and fitness, access and engagement.
  • The “people” part of fitness and what we can all learn to move forward in improving our health and fitness.
  • Philosophies and strategies within the Burnalong model.
  • How Burnalong works with employers to improve health for their employees.
  • Alex’s thoughts on how we become more aware of the ways that technology can help improve our health.

Today’s Guest

Alex Haschen is a personal trainer with specialties in nutrition, youth fitness, and habit change.  His background led him to Burnalong where he leads the business development and client engagement.

Dr. Maegan Pisman: ABA Therapy, Access & Tele-Health Tech

Season 1, Episode 9

In this podcast we speak with Dr. Maegan Pisman who specializes in providing comprehensive- and focused-treatment applied behavioral analysis (ABA) services using a telehealth model for individuals with learning deficits or behavioral challenges. Demand for ABA therapy services has accelerated rapidly since the early 1990s with much of the increase coming within the realm of interventions for individuals diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Families of people with Autism have played a major role in advocating for public policies and insurance coverage. There still remains some confusion, misunderstanding, and misrepresentation regarding these services, its applications, and qualifications for practicing ABA professionally.

Dr. Pisman has over 11 years of education, training and research experience in this area. Her range of study includes work and research in areas including assessment and treatment of severe challenging behaviors, ASD and other disabilities, as well as pediatric feeding disorders.

In this episode, we discuss:

  • Applied Behavioral Analysis (ABA) therapy and its growth within the health field.
  • Why and how tele-health has improved access and outcomes for this therapy.
  • What a tele-health visit “looks” like for her clients.
  • The benefits of engaging with tele-health technology to improve benefits in urban and rural areas.
  • Dr. Pisman’s suggestions on how we can begin opening up to alternative access models for our own health.

Today’s Guest

Dr. Maegan Pisman, founder of Imbueity, providing applied behavior analytic (ABA) services for individuals, families, students, and organizations.

Chef Tank Sanatra: Real People, Real Experience

Season 1, Episode 8

This is our first ‘Real People, Real Experience’ interview where we engage with people, like us, who have a health story and success to share.  In this podcast we talk to Chef Tank Sanatra.  Chef Sanatra’s health issues date back to the age of 11.  He shares with us his thoughts, his trials, and how he’s discovered the best solutions for his health. We get into the details so be sure to listen and be inspired.

We’ll talk to Tank Sanatra about:

  • How he has learned to take charge of his own health over the past 20 years;
  • His life and health beginning at age 11 and how he went from being Tank to Chef Sanatra
  • His thoughts and suggestions on how to interact with our medical community;
  • How Chef Sanatra has adopted a new lifestyle and food habit that some of us may find to be impossible to adopt – yet Tank finds it rewarding.

Today’s Guest:

Chef Tank Sanatra, experienced health challenges at a young age and has been inspired to explore and adopt ways to better health.  You can find Chef Sanatra on Instragram @ChefSanatra

Data as a Disruptive Habit for Health and Wellness Leaders

Data as a Disruptive Habit for Health and Wellness Leaders

What comes to your mind when you hear the term “employee health and wellness?”  For me and many employers that I speak with, this term brings to mind the long history of engaging with health and wellness partners who have promised to deliver improved health to an employee population. 

I can recall the large number of health and wellness solutions that were founded on good, solid health principles that, in theory, should have achieved measurable results of lower claim costs, more productive employees, and human resources looking like a star for implementing the program.  Unfortunately many of us have lived through the excitement of engaging with a new vendor solution just to find that lack of engagement and poor results are what laid at the end of the rainbow. 

But does it have to be that way?

I’m a believer in wellness, the healthy employee, and solid health principles.  I’m also a believer in data and tracking the right things.

In some cases it may be difficult or even nearly impossible to demonstrate short-term results that would be better derived through longer term cohort analysis, statistical overviews, and years of evaluation.  To that point, there is a way.  They are called “Guideposts.”  Guideposts are the indicators that shine within the data and can tell us whether or not we are on the right path.  They are critical and particularly valuable when we’re trying to measure the health of a population. 

First the Framework 

First things first (as my grandmother used to tell me).  We need to have a method to get at that data easily and quickly and define clear profiles of our employees. 

 1. Dynamic Data Dashboards are Imperative

What are your data sources for employee data?  Do they include employee information and health data?  I find that some organizations have access to their employee data and use it, others have access and don’t use it, and then there are many who simply do not have great access. 

The only way to “get into” your employee data is to have a system that is current, easy to manipulate and accessible. 

I’ve found that organizations approach this in one of two ways:

  • Have dedicated talent who can incorporate the data using business intelligence software such as Tableau, or
  • Engage with one of the data analytic tool vendors that will provide you with de-identified data and supportive dashboards.

Either way, we need to be able to create a system of ease and access.

2.   Sub-Profiles of your Employee Populations (plural) is Key

Nearly all organizations have different groups of employees or sub-profiles.  These sub-profiles can be described by age group, type of work, geographic location, medical plan enrollment, top diagnoses, etc.  Understanding the different types of employee groups or sub-profiles that we have within our populations, provides an overview of “who’s here.”  This is found to be a more strategic approach than simply fitting all of our employees into one big bucket instead of recognizing that each sub-profile needs a little something different.

Clear Sight in Execution

The junction of having accessible employee data and detailed sub-profiles on the employee population, makes it tremendously easy to employ a health and wellness strategy and engage the best vendors to support that strategy.  In my opinion, it is the cornerstone to a successful health and wellness strategy.  We can more accurately determine the problems we wish to tackle and predict the immediate and long-term results that we expect to see.  Now on to the guideposts…

Guidepost #1 – Expected Health Data

This reminds me of our dynamic phone maps that tell us we should expect to see a gas station, store or favorite coffee spot, as we travel to our destination.  Expected health data is very similar.  We can often expect to see certain movement with specific health or employee data elements as we move forward with a new health / wellness vendor solution.  What is it that we expect to change in that sub-profile once they engage with this new solution?

An example I’ve seen is a company pay for bariatric surgery to those who have both an obesity and type 2 diabetes diagnosis.  The employer may not be able to track an employee’s weight loss however there is the ability to track reductions in diabetic supplies and drugs.  The diabetic supplies and drugs are the guideposts.  In this instance, you can see that an impact is being made and even begin to quantify that impact in your annual budgeting.

Guidepost #2 – Engagement Upticks

One of the most difficult tasks as an employer is to get employees interested and excited about a new health / wellness solution.  We may have a proven communication strategy that we use or perhaps we get lucky because the moon and the stars aligned that day.  At any rate, tracking upticks and attempting to define their existence is a good use of our time.  I would expect that this data is tracked regularly and especially after planned communication is distributed. 

I talked to an employer who had primarily been using email for communication.  They switched to their internal Slack channel and engagement in their wellness program increased.  Funny thing is that initially they did not even notice that was happening.  Regularly reviewing this data keeps us from missing those surprises and allows us to capitalize quickly.

Guidepost #3 – Unexpected Results

Unexpected results may be the most important guidepost.  What I find most fun and interesting about the unexpected results that will emerge is that they tell us 3 things:

  • They tell us something about the type of employee who is really connecting with the program.  Perhaps it’s a different sub-profile than we expected or it’s more sub-profiles than expected. 
  • They tell us that our solution produced a broader impact than expected.  Those who have bariatric surgery not only reduce their usage of diabetes medication.  They also reduce their usage of hypertension and hyperlipidemia medications and have fewer sick days.
  • They tell us when we’re off track.  Perhaps we’re looking at the wrong indicators.  Or perhaps we have the wrong vendor solution or process in place.  Both concerns are worth thought and discussion.

What gets measured gets improved

Data, Data, Data

An effective program requires that we look towards our guideposts while adjusting and adapting throughout the year.  Data is a significant tool that helps us do that.  Data gives us the info to disrupt our status quo of anemic strategies and programs and move towards real disruption leading to positive results for our employees and our organizations.

Sylvia is a strategic advisor to emerging health and wellness companies with innovative solutions for employers and their employees.  With over 15 years of an unusual array of experience including working in the employer, consulting, and health plan environments, she brings a targeted approach to new solutions achieving remarkable results in the employer ecosystem. 

Pin It on Pinterest